We have finally reached the final statement for what we believe are the minimum set of standards that lead to excellence in short term and long term health related missions activities. Or in other words adopting and implementing these standards will lead to sufficient knowledge to match the zeal many feel for doing good through health outreaches in the name of Christ.

Todays statement has to do with multiplication. Christ spent 3 years with a very select group of 12 disciples whom he knew he would have to count on to carry on the work after his death on the cross. Yes He was aware that this group and their future followers would be equipped with the Holy Spirit to help them on their journey but his presence in the flesh provided an unprecedented level of mentorship that the world will never witness again. Now I am not implying that we (this is written chiefly to westerners involved with inter-cultural health work) should view ourselves as the world’s answer to providing mentorship to those serving in developing nation settings. On the contrary I think we have just as much to learn from them as they from us. What is taught and learned varies. But I am saying that if we who are blessed with material resources are working with developing nation partners we should always do so with a mindset of doing what we can to multiply our efforts. Make every effort to work ourselves out of a job. Or work so that at some point in the future (not too distant) our services/assistance is no longer necessary. This will require strategies of multiplication. Some ideas include:

  • We need more laborers in the harvest field! How many Christian healthcare providers are there who have felt a calling to do healthcare missions activities in international locations that are very difficult and challenging? It is likely there are MANY. Been there, done that. This article is one that helped change my life: http://www.worldmag.com/1999/06/not_to_be_served/page1If many are called but few go then our efforts at multiplication will fall short. (2X2 equals a lot less than 20X20) 
  • Encourage the creation of Christian health professional groups.
  • Multiplicative training – encouraging indigenous Christian health professionals to be engaged in missions themselves.
  • Give a man a fish -> Teach a man to fish -> Enable/Encourage a man to teach others to fish – a major challenge in the work of multiplication is that knowledge is power and as such it is shared with others sparingly. Yes, even in the church. As we help educate/equip our global partners to be more effective in their own efforts at health related kingdom initiatives we must do all we can to assure that this knowledge is shared just as freely with those they work with and serve.

No doubt many of you have other ideas about how to multiply our efforts so please add them to this discussion. Shalom, mike and the Health for All Nations team. 

 

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